Blog, Fashion
Leave a Comment

Express Your Individuality With Fall Fashion Trends

By Sophia Daugherty Muñoz, Creative Director

Consider the following when shopping these three fashion trends this fall:

Comfort Wear

People are products of their environment. Fashion works in a similar respect. Fashion’s reaction to our new environment facilitated by the pandemic has influenced a new and much needed embrace of comfort wear. 

Comfort wear, a style that is exactly what it sounds like, rests on the simple idea that one should wear what makes him or her comfortable. Why would anyone wear something uncomfortable?

Comfort is a subjective state. It is as much psychological as it is a physical phenomenon. Therefore, its meaning is unique to everyone. An uncomfortable outfit to one person could be extremely comfortable to another, just as one outfit could be seen as stylish and unstylish at the same time. 

Where fashion is involved, there will always be a discrepancy. 

Comfort wear is not a new trend, but one that has recently been growing a larger following since the world has become more isolated by COVID-19. Billie Eilish is notorious for styling comfort wear. She is known for wearing clothing that isn’t form-fitting yet makes intentional and bold fashion statements. 

Eilish talks about her style and the psychological connection she has to it in an interview with Vogue Australia and says, “What I like about just dressing like I’m 800 sizes bigger than I am is [that] it … allows nobody to judge what your body looks like. I don’t want to give anyone the excuse of judging … It’s not like everyone’s going to judge you, but they all do in their head, even if they’re not trying to.”

Eilish also mentions her style being her “security blanket.” This analogy highlights how fashion can function as an expressively therapeutic art form. 

View this post on Instagram

“my future” out thursday

A post shared by BILLIE EILISH (@billieeilish) on

Comfort wear is a revolutionary fashion trend in that it distances itself from other trends commonly known to be limited by gender. Instead, it has become an interpretative style focused on the individual’s feeling of comfort. 

As we say goodbye to summer, we greet the season of outerwear. Blazers, long coats and statement collars will be at the forefront of our minds this fall. Spice up a blazer with a colorful hoodie underneath, or pair it with joggers to give your comfortable look a more sophisticated flare. 

Boots 

They went on summer vacation in our closets but are back to tear up the virtual town. If you’re looking to invest in some new boots for the upcoming season, consider these three important ideas before purchasing: 

Sustainably sourced material: Cheap boots are made of faux leather, AKA plastic. Buying real leather that is ethically obtained is a better alternative to buying plastic shoes that won’t last you through the year. Leather is biodegradable, unlike plastic. 
Quality: Well-made boots should last you a long time. They should support your feet while also enduring the cold winter elements. 
Transparency: The artists creating the shoes should be treated and compensated appropriately. Choose a brand that is committed to making the lives of their workers better! 
Boot Brands to buy: Nae, Red Wing Boots and Bhava

Individualism

Individualism is more of a fashion philosophy rather than a trend but is relevant to this topic. 

Fashion individualism is personal style. It’s how one communicates with the world in a uniquely individual perspective. Trends are important to understanding the collective voice of fashion, but individualism is a reaction to how one is influenced by trends as well as other environmental and social factors. Understanding your perspective will allow you to communicate expressively through fashion and life. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s